frequently asked questions

  • What is a pediatric dentist?

    A pediatric dentist has an extra two years of specialized training after dental school and is dedicated to the oral health of children from infancy through the teenage years. The very young, pre-teens, and teenagers all need different approaches in dealing with behavior,  guiding their growth and development, and helping them avoid future dental problems.

     

    With the additional education, pediatric dentists have the training which allows them to offer the most up-to-date and thorough treatment for a wide variety of pediatric dental problems.

  • At what age should I schedule my child’s first visit?

    According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, your child should be seen by their 1st birthday or 6 months after the eruption of their first tooth.

     

    Beginning dental care at an early age allows guidance for caring for your child's teeth and opportunities to address preventive issues that are important for healthy teeth and a pleasing smile. Early visits also help establish a positive relationship between our office and your child.

  • How often should my child see a pediatric dentist?

    The American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend visiting a dentist twice a year for a checkup and a professional cleaning. Our office also recommends two visits per year.

  • Why are baby teeth so important?

    It is very important to maintain the health of primary teeth (baby teeth).  Neglected cavities can cause pain and infection, and can also lead to problems which affect the developing permanent teeth.

     

    Primary teeth, which generally fall out between the ages of 5 and 12, are important for (1) proper chewing and eating, (2) providing space for permanent teeth and guiding them into position, and (3) permitting normal development of the jaw bones and muscles.

  • Why does my child need dental x-rays?

    Radiographs (x-rays) are a necessary part of your child's dental diagnostic process.  Without them, certain cavities will be missed.  They also help survey developing teeth, evaluate results of an injury, or plan for orthodontic treatment.  If dental problems are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable for your child, and more affordable for you.

     

    On average, our office will request bitewing radiographs approximately once a year and panoramic radiographs every 3-5 years.  In children with a high risk of tooth decay, we will recommend radiographs and examinations every six months.

     

    With contemporary safeguards, the amount of radiation received in a dental x-ray examination is extremely small.  The risk is negligible.  In fact, the dental radiographs represent a far smaller risk than an undetected and untreated dental problem.  Today's equipment restricts the beam to the area of interest.

  • What are sealants, fillings and crowns?

    A sealant is a composite material that is applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, where a majority of cavities in children can form.  This sealant acts as a barrier to food, plaque, and acid, thus protecting decay-prone areas of the teeth.  However, cavities between the teeth are not protected by sealants.  As long as there is no decay in the tooth, sealants will be recommended for most permanent teeth.

     

    If your child has a cavity, a filling is placed after the cavity is removed.  The filling is tooth colored (white).

     

    In a primary tooth, if a cavity is large and affects the nerve of the tooth, then the damaged part of the nerve will be removed (puplpotomy) along with the decay, and a crown will be placed.

  • What can I do about my child’s toothache?

    Clean the area around the sore tooth thoroughly.  Rinse the mouth with warm salt water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris.  DO NOT place aspirin on the gum or on the aching tooth.  If the face is swollen or the pain still persists, contact our office as soon as possible.

  • Our child has fractured his tooth. What do you suggest?

    Rinse debris from injured area with warm water.  Place a cold compress over the face, not the tooth, in the area of injury. Locate and save any broken tooth fragments in milk.

     

    Contact our office as soon as possible.

  • My child accidentally knocked out their permanent tooth.

    What should I do?

    If the entire tooth comes out, try to put it back into the socket and call us at 865-229-4969.  If you cannot get the tooth back in, store it in milk and bring it with you to our office.  If you cannot get in touch with our office or the office is closed, please take the tooth with you to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, 2018 W Clinch Ave, Knoxville TN.  Time is really critical in these situations.

 

We are here for you and your child.

 

Our goal is to exceed your expectations.

 

From the time children grow the first tooth until they are ready for an adult dentist, Dr. Beth and her team help care for and protect growing smiles.  Children are very different than adults and so is our approach to caring for them.  We treat your children as if they were our own and we want each visit to be fun and educational.

Meet Dr. Beth Fancher

Learn All About Dr. Beth

Hi!

 

I’m Dr. Beth - a dentist who gets nervous when it is my turn to the see the dentist.  So, I recognize this can be challenging for people of all ages. My goal is to help children understand it doesn’t have to be, but if it is, we can get through it together.

 

As a parent, I know it takes a huge leap of faith to put my child in the care of someone else. As a pediatric dentist, I don’t take this for granted.  Thank you for trusting me to care for your child and allowing me the privilege of doing just that.

 

Gratefully,

 

Dr. Beth Fancher

Pediatric Dentist at Hardin Valley Children’s Dentistry

A Peek at Our Pediatric Dentistry Services

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Call Us

865-229-4969

 

Our Location

10238 Hardin Valley Rd.

Knoxville, TN 37932

 

Email Us

hello@hvsmiles.com

We welcome you and your children to our dental home.

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  • What is a pediatric dentist?

    A pediatric dentist has an extra two years of specialized training after dental school and is dedicated to the oral health of children from infancy through the teenage years. The very young, pre-teens, and teenagers all need different approaches in dealing with behavior,  guiding their growth and development, and helping them avoid future dental problems.

     

    With the additional education, pediatric dentists have the training which allows them to offer the most up-to-date and thorough treatment for a wide variety of pediatric dental problems.

  • At what age should I schedule my child’s first visit?

    According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, your child should be seen by their 1st birthday or 6 months after the eruption of their first tooth.

     

    Beginning dental care at an early age allows guidance for caring for your child's teeth and opportunities to address preventive issues that are important for healthy teeth and a pleasing smile. Early visits also help establish a positive relationship between our office and your child.

  • How often should my child see a pediatric dentist?

    The American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend visiting a dentist twice a year for a checkup and a professional cleaning. Our office also recommends two visits per year.

  • Why are baby teeth so important?

    It is very important to maintain the health of primary teeth (baby teeth).  Neglected cavities can cause pain and infection, and can also lead to problems which affect the developing permanent teeth.

     

    Primary teeth, which generally fall out between the ages of 5 and 12, are important for (1) proper chewing and eating, (2) providing space for permanent teeth and guiding them into position, and (3) permitting normal development of the jaw bones and muscles.

  • Why does my child need dental x-rays?

    Radiographs (x-rays) are a necessary part of your child's dental diagnostic process.  Without them, certain cavities will be missed.  They also help survey developing teeth, evaluate results of an injury, or plan for orthodontic treatment.  If dental problems are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable for your child, and more affordable for you.

     

    On average, our office will request bitewing radiographs approximately once a year and panoramic radiographs every 3-5 years.  In children with a high risk of tooth decay, we will recommend radiographs and examinations every six months.

     

    With contemporary safeguards, the amount of radiation received in a dental x-ray examination is extremely small.  The risk is negligible.  In fact, the dental radiographs represent a far smaller risk than an undetected and untreated dental problem.  Today's equipment restricts the beam to the area of interest.

  • What are sealants, fillings and crowns?

    A sealant is a composite material that is applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, where a majority of cavities in children can form.  This sealant acts as a barrier to food, plaque, and acid, thus protecting decay-prone areas of the teeth.  However, cavities between the teeth are not protected by sealants.  As long as there is no decay in the tooth, sealants will be recommended for most permanent teeth.

     

    If your child has a cavity, a filling is placed after the cavity is removed.  The filling is tooth colored (white).

     

    In a primary tooth, if a cavity is large and affects the nerve of the tooth, then the damaged part of the nerve will be removed (puplpotomy) along with the decay, and a crown will be placed.

  • What can I do about my child’s toothache?

    Clean the area around the sore tooth thoroughly.  Rinse the mouth with warm salt water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris.  DO NOT place aspirin on the gum or on the aching tooth.  If the face is swollen or the pain still persists, contact our office as soon as possible.

  • Our son has fractured his tooth.
    What do you suggest?

    Rinse debris from injured area with warm water.  Place a cold compress over the face, not the tooth, in the area of injury. Locate and save any broken tooth fragments in milk.

     

    Contact our office as soon as possible.

  • My child accidentally knocked out their permanent tooth.

    What should I do?

    If the entire tooth comes out, try to put it back into the socket and call us at 865-229-4969.  If you cannot get the tooth back in, store it in milk and bring it with you to our office.  If you cannot get in touch with our office or the office is closed, please take the tooth with you to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, 2018 W Clinch Ave, Knoxville TN.  Time is really critical in these situations.